Wednesday, February 25, 2015

strange way for celebs to exit

strange way for celebs to exit

A few nice celebs images I found:

strange way for celebs to exit celebs
Image by brizzle born and bred Not that you need to think about it, but if you do, you’ll see that money and glory won’t make you live happily ever after. Some of the most bizarre deaths happened to those who had it all. Money, fame, men or women, TV time, radio time, red carpet appearances and also very strange ends. It seems they just managed to live their lives to the fullest before leaving under strange circumstances. One thing is for sure, money and fame could not save them. Robert Gaston "Bobby" Fuller (October 22, 1942 â€" July 18, 1966) was an American rock singer, songwriter, and guitar player best known for his singles "I Fought the Law" and "Love's Made a Fool of You," recorded with his mid-1960s group, the Bobby Fuller Four. Born in Baytown, Texas, Robert Gaston Fuller spent most of his youth in El Paso, Texas, where he idolized Buddy Holly, a fellow Texan (Holly was a native of Lubbock, Texas). He played in clubs and bars, and recorded on independent record labels in Texas, with a constantly-changing line-up, during the early 1960s. The only constant band members were Fuller himself (on vocals and guitar), and his younger brother, Randy Fuller on bass. Death It was sometime during the hot late afternoon hours of Monday, July 18th, that Bobby Fuller's body was found, lying across the front seat of his mother's Oldsmobile, which was parked in the large lot beside the apartment he shared with his younger brother, bassist Randy Fuller. An eyewitness to the gruesome discovery remembers that Fuller had traces of dried blood around his chin and mouth, and that his face and chest were bruised as if he had been beaten. Fuller's hair and clothing were also soaked with gasoline, and his right hand still clenched a rubber siphoning-tube. Crime scene investigators made so many baffling errors in judgment that it seems some kind of "police cover-up" may have actually taken place. An empty gas can, found in the back seat, was removed by a policeman (who apparently didn't consider it vital to the investigation) and thrown into a nearby dumpster. Within months of "I Fought The Law" becoming a top 10 hit, Fuller was found dead in an automobile parked outside his Hollywood apartment. The Los Angeles deputy medical examiner, Jerry Nelson, performed the autopsy. According to Dean Kuipers: "The report states that Bobby's face, chest, and side were covered in "petechial hemorrhages" probably caused by gasoline vapors and the summer heat. He found no bruises, no broken bones, no cuts. No evidence of beating." Kuipers further explains that boxes for "accident" and "suicide" were ticked, but next to the boxes were question marks. Despite the official cause of death, some commentators believe Fuller was murdered. Erik Greene, a relative of Sam Cooke, has cited similarities in the deaths of Cooke and Fuller. Fuller bandmate, Jim Reese, suspected that Charles Manson may have had something to do with Fuller's death but never provided credible evidence. A sensationalist crime website has speculated that the LAPD may have been involved because of Bobby's connection to a Mafia-related woman. Fuller is buried in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Los Angeles. There were also rumors that he had actually drank gasoline, though a Stanford University crime professor reported (in 1966) that "no one has ever successfully killed themselves by drinking gasoline. One could not be able to keep it down, if they could get it down. They would simply throw up before they could die from it." Another rumor was that Fuller had overdosed on LSD or some other kind of hallucinogenic drug at a Malibu Beach party the night before. The people at the parties were celebrities, and to avoid a scandal, they poured gasoline down his throat, saturated his hair and they planned to torch the car---to make it look like a "mob slaying"--yet no trace of drugs appear in the autopsy report, and no traces of gasoline had actually been swallowed. Fuller was buried four days later at Forest Lawn Cemetary in Burbank. Case closed. After his brother's death, Randy Fuller took over lead vocal duties and named the band after himself, but the band broke up within months of Bobby's death. Randy Fuller recorded a couple of solo singles, then in spring 1969 joined Dewey Martin's New Buffalo (Springfield), which evolved into Blue Mountain Eagle in July 1969. He appeared on the band's lone LP for Atco Records in early 1970 before briefly joining Dewey Martin and Medicine Ball. Bobby Fuller's recordings have been reissued by Norton Records, Del-Fi Records, Rhino Records and Munster Records.

strange way for celebs to exit celebs
Image by brizzle born and bred Not that you need to think about it, but if you do, you’ll see that money and glory won’t make you live happily ever after. Some of the most bizarre deaths happened to those who had it all. Money, fame, men or women, TV time, radio time, red carpet appearances and also very strange ends. It seems they just managed to live their lives to the fullest before leaving under strange circumstances. One thing is for sure, money and fame could not save them. Grace Patricia Kelly (November 12, 1929 â€" September 14, 1982) was an American film actress who, after marrying Prince Rainier III became known as the Princess of Monaco. After embarking on an acting career in 1950, at the age of 20, Grace Kelly appeared in New York City theatrical productions and more than 40 episodes of live drama productions broadcast during the early 1950s Golden Age of Television. In October 1953, Grace gained stardom from her performance in the film Mogambo. This film won her a Golden Globe Award and an Academy Award nomination in 1954. She then had leading roles in five films, including The Country Girl, in which she gave a deglamorized, Academy Awardâ€"winning performance. She retired from acting at the age of 26 to marry Prince Rainier and begin her duties in Monaco. She and Prince Rainier had three children: Caroline, Albert, and Stéphanie. She retained her American roots, maintaining dual U.S. and Monégasque citizenship. Grace Kelly died on September 14, 1982, a day after a stroke caused her to lose control of her car and have an accident. On September 13, 1982, Grace Kelly was driving back to Monaco from her country home in Roc Agel when she suddenly suffered from a stroke. As a result, she lost control of her Rover P6 and drove off the steep, winding road and down the 120 ft mountainside. Her daughter Stéphanie, who was in the passenger seat, tried to regain control of the car, but was unsuccessful. When paramedics arrived at the crash site Grace was alive but unconscious. Grace and Stephanie were transported to the Monaco Hospital (later named The Princess Grace Hospital Centre). Doctors tried to stop her internal bleeding during surgery and performed CAT scans to diagnose her brain damage. Despite their efforts, her head injuriesâ€"in addition to her fractured ribs, collarbone, and thighâ€"were irreparable. Doctor's believed that she had suffered a minor stroke prior to the crash, which made her more susceptible to another. The following night at 10:55pm, Grace passed away at the age of 52 after Prince Rainier made the difficult decision to take her off life support. Stephanie's original diagnosis was mild, with only minor bruising and a light concussion. However, after receiving x-ray results, she was found to have suffered a hairline fracture on the seventh cervical vertebra. She was unable to attend Grace's funeral due to her injuries. Grace's funeral was held at the Saint Nicholas Cathedral, Monaco in Monaco on September 18, 1982. After a Requiem Mass, she was buried in the Grimaldi family vault. Over 400 guests attended the funeral, including First Lady Nancy Reagan, Diana, Princess of Wales, and Cary Grant. At the funeral, James Stewart delivered the following eulogy: “You know, I just love Grace Kelly. Not because she was a princess, not because she was an actress, not because she was my friend, but because she was just about the nicest lady I ever met. Grace brought into my life as she brought into yours, a soft, warm light every time I saw her, and every time I saw her was a holiday of its own. No question, I'll miss her, we'll all miss her, God bless you, Princess Grace.” Prince Rainier, who did not remarry, was buried alongside her following his death in 2005. On Sept. 13, 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco was killed when the car she was driving somersaulted over a cliff. Her daughter, Princess Stephanie, who was with her, had not spoken on the record about the crash until an interview with author Jeffrey Robinson for his book, ``Rainier and Grace: An Intimate Portrait.`` She recounts the accident in this excerpt from the book. At about 9 a.m., on Monday, Sept. 13, 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco woke her daughter, Stephanie. They had tickets for a train to Paris, where Stephanie, 17, would start school on Wednesday. While Grace was getting ready to leave for the palace, her chauffeur brought the 11-year-old metallic green Rover 3500 out of the garage and parked it in front of the house at Roc Agel, the royal family`s farm, in the hills above Monaco. When Grace came out of the house, her arms were full of dresses which she spread flat across the rear seat of the car. A maid followed with other dresses and large hat boxes, and together they filled the rear seat. Then she called for Stephanie. Grace`s chauffeur was standing by the car, ready to drive the two of them to the palace. Grace didn`t much like driving and didn`t do a lot of it, although she liked the Rover. There wasn`t a lot of mileage on it because she didn`t use it much. Still, she always insisted it be well maintained. It hardly, if ever, went any farther from the palace garage than Roc Agel. And even then it usually was driven by a chauffeur. Now, however, with the back seat covered, there wasn`t room enough for Grace and Stephanie and a chauffeur. Grace told her chauffeur that it would be easier if she drove. He said that there was no need for that. If she left the dresses there, he would drive her down and then come back for the clothes. She said, no, please don`t bother, she would drive. He kept trying to persuade her, but Grace insisted. So Grace got behind the wheel, and Stephanie climbed into the passenger seat. At about 10 a.m. they pulled away from Roc Agel. The road from the farm winds down the hill and into La Turbie. The road from there down to the Moyenne Corniche, which takes you into Monaco, is called the D37. Approximately 2 miles from La Turbie, there is an especially steep bend where you have to brake very hard and steer carefully to follow the road 150 degrees to the right. Grace missed that turn. The Rover slammed into the small retaining wall and went through it. The car somersaulted as it crashed 120 feet through branches of trees, careening off the slope, tossing Grace and Stephanie around inside. The accident that claimed the life of the former Grace Kelly captured the attention of the world. Nearly 100 million people watched the funeral of the former American movie star on Saturday, Sept. 18: Her husband, Prince Rainier, in his uniform, shattered with grief, his oldest child, Caroline, veiled in black, reaching out to touch him. His son, Albert, walked at his side, holding his father`s arm. Stephanie, the youngest of Grace and Rainier`s three children, was not present at the funeral. Still hospitalized for minor injuries from the accident, she wasn`t told of her mother`s death until two days after the crash. Caroline is the only member of the family to have discussed with Stephanie what happened in the car that morning. ``Stephanie told me, `Mommy kept saying, I can`t stop. The brakes don`t work. I can`t stop.` She said that Mommy was in a complete panic. Stephanie grabbed the hand brake. She told me right after the accident, `I pulled on the hand brake but it wouldn`t stop. I tried but I just couldn`t stop the car.` `` Stephanie, now 24, says she has never discussed the accident with her father or brother. Some people close to the family say they think that Stephanie has since blocked the accident out of her mind, that she remembers nothing of what happened. This is not the case, she said in a taped interview. ``I remember every minute of it,`` she says, trying to retain her composure. `It`s only in the last few years that I`ve been starting to cope with it. I had some professional help and especially in the last eight months I`ve been learning to deal with it. I still can`t go down that road, even if someone else is driving. I always ask them to take the other road. But at least I can talk about it without crying. Although it`s hard for me to get it out in front of my dad. As far as I`m concerned, I can live with it. But I still can`t talk to my dad about it because I know it hurts him and I don`t want to do that because I love him.`` Black out at the wheel Family members recall that Grace was tired at the end of that busy summer. They remember her being irritable, suffering from high blood pressure (later published reports quote her doctors as saying that she did not have high blood pressure) and going through menopause.

strange way for celebs to exit celebs
Image by brizzle born and bred Not that you need to think about it, but if you do, you’ll see that money and glory won’t make you live happily ever after. Some of the most bizarre deaths happened to those who had it all. Money, fame, men or women, TV time, radio time, red carpet appearances and also very strange ends. It seems they just managed to live their lives to the fullest before leaving under strange circumstances. One thing is for sure, money and fame could not save them. The lead singer of INXS, Michael Hutchence was returning to Sydney, his native city, for a concert tour to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the band’s birth. Twenty years in the business implies stamina, steeliness and an instinct for survival, qualities denied to many in that arena. And for Hutchence, at 37, this voyage had a special purpose. He was preparing for the arrival of his girlfriend, the TV personality Paula Yates, also 37 at the time, and their 16 month-old daughter, Heavenly Hiraani Tiger Lily. Hutchence had become exasperated by the couple’s treatment at the hands of the British tabloids, and of the endless legal battles with Yates’s former husband, the rock singer Bob Geldof, over her three children from that marriage. He planned to set up a new life for his new family in Australia, from where he would embark on the next stage of his career as a solo singer and actor. As he approached 40, everything looked ok. Or so he told. Underneath, however, Hutchence was very insecure. Ever since a freak accident in 1992 robbed him of most of his senses of taste and smell, he had become increasingly prone to depression. He would even burst into tears for almost any reason. On the morning of 22 November 1997, Hutchence was found dead in his hotel room in Sydney. His death was reported by the New South Wales Coroner as the result of suicide. In 2000, Yates died of a heroin overdose and the couple’s daughter was placed in Geldof’s custody with her half-sisters. In 1999 in a paid interview on 60 Minutes and in a documentary film on Channel 4, Yates claimed that Hutchence's death may have resulted from autoerotic asphyxiation which contradicted her previous statements to police investigators and the coroner. In producing his coroner's report, Hand had specifically considered the suggestions of accidental death (coupled with the fact that Hutchence left no suicide note) but had discounted it based on substantial evidence presented to the contrary. Despite the official coroner's report, fans and relatives considered his death accidental. Bono of the Irish rock band U2, a good friend of Hutchence, wrote "Stuck in a Moment You Can't Get Out Of", which is interpreted as an intervention with him. In a 2005 interview, Bono regretted that he had not spent more time with Hutchence. Bono's wife, Alison Hewson had seen Hutchence prior to the Australian trip and noted "he looked a bit shaky to her. The dispute between Geldof and Hutchence family members over Tiger continued. Geldof legally adopted Tiger, against the wishes of Patricia and Tina, who disagreed with Geldof changing her surname to Hutchence-Geldof. In July 2009, Patricia protested that Geldof had prevented access to her granddaughter for three years, "It's totally cruel and unnecessary. I've lost my husband and now I have a granddaughter who doesn't even know her beloved Grandpa Ross [Glassop] has died. We have been completely cut out of her life by Bob Geldof." Patricia requested a visit with Tiger from Geldof for the 50th anniversary of Hutchence's birth (22 January 2010) and indicated that she accepted her son's death as being a suicide. Patricia died on 21 September 2010; Tiger was not in attendance at her funeral due to Geldof's fear of attention that would be generated. Her uncle Rhett indicated that Geldof had sent condolences, that he had spoken to Tiger and agreed it was advisable to keep the 14-year-old out of the media.